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Full Interview with Paul Gascoigne “Gazza” – Football Interviews FIFA World Cup- 18+

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Paul Gasgoinge Interview Gazza
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‘Gazza’ one of England’s brightest talents in the 80s and 90s, Paul Gascoigne stays one of English football’s most notable characters.

We caught the full interview with England football legend Gazza!! He takes us through his career and his rise to the most well known players in English football history; filled with entertaining highs and lows!

Let us know your favorite Gazza moments by heading to our YouTube channel and dropping a comment!

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The Life of Grace Darling – North East History

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The story is straightforward: in 1838, a strong and brave woman rescued nine passengers from a sinking ship. Learn why her story is still being told today, more than 180 years later.

When Grace Darling’s life changed, she was 22.

A steamer known as the Forfarshire was travelling from Hull, in Yorkshire, to Dundee, in Scotland, on the evening of September 7, 1838. The ship’s engines broke out, putting 60 crew members and guests in danger during a storm.

The Longstone Lighthouse was mistaken for the Inner Farne Lighthouse, which was closer to the beach, when the captain was looking for protection. The ship was lifted into the air by a massive wave before it slammed with Big Harcar rock.

Within 15 minutes, half of the ship sank, killing hundreds of adults, children, and infants. Some people didn’t even have time to get out of their cabins. Nine passengers successfully boarded the lifeboat. Nine more survivors climbed up the rocks and out of the surging ocean.

Grace Darling first noticed the silhouette of the wreck at 4.45 am from the Longstone Lighthouse. At seven in the morning, she noticed survivors moving about on Big Harcar rock.

Grace and her father, William, anticipated that the North Sunderland lifeboat wouldn’t be able to launch because of the weather. They both believed it was their responsibility to try to save the surviving.

Grace and William start the rescue effort

On their coble, a wooden rowing boat, they each took one oar. They had to row for over a mile to avoid the sharp rocks and get to the survivors safely because to the high tide and wind.

Grace was left to manage the boat by herself when William sprang from the boat and onto the rocks. She had to take both oars and row backwards and forwards to keep it in place and prevent it from hitting the reef. William discovered eight individuals on the rocks, one of them was seriously hurt. A woman carrying two children who had both passed away was also present.

Only the injured guy and the woman, together with three other men, William and Grace, could fit aboard the boat. William joined the three men as they rowed back to the lighthouse. Together with her mother, Grace stayed at the lighthouse and took care of the survivors.

The remaining four soldiers were brought back by her father and two members of the Forfarshire crew.

Following the rescue: recognising bravery

The Royal Humane Society presented Grace and her father with gold medals, while the Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck presented them with silver medals for gallantry (now the Royal National Lifeboat Institution). She was the initial female recipient of an RNLI Medal. Even Queen Victoria forwarded her £50.

 

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The History Behind Durham Cathedral

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We take a delve into the History Behind Durham Cathedral…

The Norman Conquest in 1066 was one of the most important events in English history. As the first Norman ruler of England, William the Conqueror began establishing a new English monarchy. We frequently discuss the effects this had on English culture, but we also need to acknowledge the significant effects it also had on English architecture.

William brought Norman architectural traditions to England, and Durham Cathedral, which is close to William’s palace, is the first outstanding example of this (Durham Castle). Durham Cathedral, the first of its sort and a fitting representation of a new, Norman England, occupies a significant place in history and architecture.

Origins 

Soon after William the Conqueror’s passing in 1093, construction on Durham Cathedral got underway. But why did this place need a church? That tale was first told by St. Cuthbert, the Bishop of Lindisfarne in the seventh century. In the ninth century, Lindisfarne monks escaped with St. Cuthbert’s remains before the casket became too heavy to lift out of fear of Viking assaults.

They constructed a shrine after interpreting this as proof that the saint had chosen this location as a suitable grave. It’s hardly unexpected that the monks chose this location for their new residence given that they were escaping Vikings; the peninsula is naturally protected by steep riverbanks. A church was constructed throughout the ensuing decades and developed into a well-liked destination for pilgrims.

William of Calais was chosen by William after arriving in England to become the first Prince-Bishop of Durham. The Bishop has many responsibilities. One of his duties was to defend and advance the faith. This task involved constructing a larger cathedral to hold St. Cuthbert’s relics and accommodate an increasing number of pilgrims. Additionally, the Venerable Bede’s remains, who was one of the most important thinkers in mediaeval England, were transported to Durham. Construction on the impressive Durham Cathedral started in 1093 after detailed plans had been made.

Building the Cathedral

Durham Cathedral intended to be totally composed of stone, unlike the majority of English cathedrals at the period, which were at least largely constructed of wood. That was significant. Since the fall of the Roman Empire, no one had fully mastered stone architecture, therefore this was a challenging project. One reason was that it needed a great deal of organisation and preparation since craftsmen and employees were hired. In addition, it needed a lot of stone—a lot more than the typical building at the time. Fortunately, a sandstone quarry was close by, but moving enough material required extensive planning, cooperation, and newly standardised quarrying techniques.

How the engineers would construct a building with a stone roof was the great unknown. Romanesque was the name of the period’s architectural style, which was more of a general trend in Europe than an united movement. Romanesque structures were entirely composed of stone, but only due to their extreme thickness, weight, and lack of windows were they able to carry that much weight.

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Top 10 most haunted places in the Northeast of England

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10# Royalty Theatre

The Royalty Theatre in Sunderland starts the list of haunted locations in the North East.

The theatre, which was first constructed as a church in the 19th century and later used as a hospital during World War I, is rumoured to be the site of poltergeist activity and unexplained footstep sounds both on stage and in the wings.

Additionally, there have been numerous tales of a ghost sitting in the back of the auditorium, sending chills down the spines of viewers.

Interviewees reported hearing “disembodied voices, signals on a spirit box, orbs, lights, full-blown sightings, odours, and even just feelings,” according to paranormal reporter Matthew Hutton, who conducted the research.

9# Flodden Field

At Flodden Field up to 19,000 soldiers died in the biggest English-Scottish combat ever fought on Flodden Field in 1513. It is still conceivably the most spooky location in Britain.

8# Marsden Grotto

The Marsden Grotto, which is located in Marsden Bay in South Shields at the base of the limestone cliffs, 
is serious candidate for the title of Britain’s most haunted pub.
This is due to accounts of unsettling pounding noises coming from the cellar and eerie bare footprints on the bar floor that simply won’t wash away.
Aside from those restless ghosts, it is also said that The Shoney, sea monster, is hiding in Marsden Bay.
7# Blanchland
With barely over 100 residents, this charming Northumberland village has a lyrical name but a terrifying past that can be traced from the church’s cemetery, where monks who were killed in a brutal raid repose.

According to legend, a dense fog covered the valley, confusing the Blanchland monks as they prepared to defend themselves against savage outlaws intent on pillaging their monastery.

The monks began to rejoice, believing this to be a divine intervention. However, the peal of bells attracted the attackers’ attention and helped them find the monastery, where they eventually slaughtered the monks.

There are rumours that a funeral knell has been ringing since the slaughter and that the graveyard contains vague silhouettes of the deceased friars.

6# The Ship Isis 

This Sunderland bar is said to be a favourite stopping point for local paranormal investigators. It is said to be haunted by the spirit of serial killer Mary Ann Cotton as well as some of her 21 poisoned victims, including two of her own children who were purportedly buried in the basement of the bar.

This Halloween, be prepared for phantom cries and screams to fill the bar and unexpected appearances of a woman dressed in Victorian attire.

5# Newcastle Castle Keep

A ghost known as “Poppy Girl” is said to haunt the 12th-century monument in Newcastle. She was a flower girl who was imprisoned in the castle and ultimately perished there.

She has been seen multiple times exploring the premises, and whenever she appears, there is typically the scent of new flowers in the air.

While speaking with a staff member at Newcastle’s Castle Keep, psychic world correspondent Matthew Hutton reported that the employee claimed that “he was thrown to the floor by an invisible force and scratched on the leg, causing a wound so deep that it required stitches.” The hotel goes on to say that not all ghosts residing on the property are as innocent and harmless.

 

Watch our video below for the Final top 5 not listed here!

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